How and Why to Learn SQL to Be a Better Marketer

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Why Learn SQL

You've probably had run into a situation where you wanted to know the answer to a question like this:

"I wonder the average number of actions a user takes on my website?"

Or this:

"I'm curious who the top 10% of my users are who do some action?"

Or this:

"How can I see the emails of all users who signed up after May?"

These are all incredibly reasonable questions to ask for actionable data that can improve your marketing efforts. But what recourse do you have to answer them? Maybe you ask your development team to find answers for you - on top of their already hectic schedule. Maybe you use your admin tools in a hack-y way to arrive at an answer. Maybe you can't answer them at all.

This is why you need SQL. Using SQL allows you to answer and execute on these questions.

But the best reason to learn SQL is that it's easy to learn and it will empower you to your job better.

I recently taught myself SQL from scratch over just a weekend and now use it all the time. Here's how you can too.

How to Learn SQL

There are a number of good resources around the web to learn SQL. I personally found this Udemy course by Bucky Roberts to be easy, clear, and comprehensive. For whatever reason, the Udemy videos end early. You can watch the rest of Bucky's series at thenewboston.

UPDATE: Just learned of a new Udemy course by Justin Mares that is incredibly comperehensive and aimed at marketers. Check out SQL for Marketers

To get a SQL server quickly onto your computer to use as you go through the course, download MAMP

Here are some other recommended resources if you want to learn SQL: * Schemaverse * GalaXQL - Interactive SQL tutorial * SQL Problems and Solutions - INteractive textbook * Learn SQL The Hard Way (ALPHA) * SQLZOO

If you take an hour every night during a week or just spend some time on the weekend, you'll be up and running with SQL in no time.

Bonus - SQL Syntax

I took notes on syntax while taking Bucky Robert's course. Hopefully you find this a good crib-sheet. I refer to it all the time. If you're stuck, you can always try Googling the answer as well.

Download this file

Social Media Resolutions for 2014

Here are some ways I hope to improve my social media habits in 2014. I hope it gives you some ideas about how you should be using social media in 2014 as well.

1. Don't be lazy - Post natively for each platform

A lot of tools for social media (including Hootsuite, Buffer, and Sprout Social) let you queue or schedule posts, which can be incredibly useful. Most of those services also let you write one post and share it to multiple social networks.

Increasingly, I find this does not work because it's lazy. It's so easy to just post once. But the result is not optimized for each platform. It ignores the platform's context even if it's good content.

This year I resolve that when I want to share on multiple networks, I'll do so in a native format for each.

2. More pictures

Twitter really put a big emphasis at the end of 2013 on pictures, with pictures included in the stream of the mobile app and also in direct messages. Pictures already engaged better on Facebook. And of course Instagram and Pinterest are built on pictures. I plan on including a picture with every post, if at all possible. Even a picture of text can be interesting and informative.

I wrote this blog post with Draft

I wrote this blog post with Draft

3. Engage influencers through lists

Torrey Dye wrote one of my favorite social media posts of the year on how to engage with influencers. It requires some setup by creating a twitter list, but it works. I intend to follow it this year.

4. Test and embrace emerging platforms

Vine, Snapchat, and Instagram Video all took off in 2013. I can't predict what product will break out in 2014, but whatever it may be, I plan to embrace it. Get on early, experiment with the format, and find out what works. Getting in early is an easy way to gain a competitive advantage.

5. Use one platform to drive data to another

My favorite and most used social network is twitter. It's also not surprisingly where I have the largest following. I of course have a presence on most other social networks, plus slideshare and my email newsletter which I want to grow.

I plan to use twitter to build awareness of my other presences. Especially my email newsletter - with twitter lead gen cards - which you should sign up for here.

Measuring to Get More Users

Do you think your good intuition and maybe some user testing is all you’ll need to grow your product online? Or do you believe you know how to convert users given some of the strong progress you’ve already made?

Not so fast, you’re probably missing out on really understanding what’s driving use of your product or app. And then, your chances of scaling online? Very low.

The great thing about the web, is it’s fairly simple to get valuable insight and measure every step to acquire a new user. Let’s go through some basics with how to set up your funnel.

To start, check out the free option of Google Analytics. Paid options such as KISSmetrics and MixPanel (funnel image below) can be easier to set up, and allow you to track events not just page views.

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Choose your Metrics
No matter what type of product you’re selling, there are two parts of the funnel that will always need to measure: (1) acquisition which is the broadest measure at the top of your funnel and (2) an end goal.

One useful measurement of customer acquisition to begin with is daily unique visits (UVs). It’s analogous to the number of people who visit a brick-and-mortar store. This broader measure is the number of people you’re going to have a chance to sell to each day.

The next step would be establishing a goal. This could be sales if you’re distributing a product. With an online sale, you can track how many people hit the completed order confirmation page. Starting from visits, you now know the percentage of users that view your site to purchase.

For engagement focused websites, your goal will likely vary but revolve around a core use of your product. Along these lines, Fred Wilson talks about the atomic unit of unit of a product. For example, on Twitter the atomic unit would be a Tweet, and something to measure could be Tweets sent per day, or number of users followed. For your product, think about what your goal is and then determine a metric to optimize for.

Implementing Tracking
At this point, we now we know how many people convert to a transaction from visiting your site, but not where those who don’t make it drop off. Knowing where potential users are leaking out of your funnel is critical in understanding where you need to focus to increase conversion rates to your end goal.

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On an eCommerce website, a critical part of the funnel is tracking when a customer adds an item to their cart. Here, the funnel should track how many people convert from the cart page, to billing page, to payment page, to the review order page, to the confirmation page.

Using Google Analytics page (as shown above) each step should be built with a unique URL. Once implemented, you’ll now be able to see where any significant drop offs occur from the cart page to the billing page, and you’ll know where to focus your resources on improving conversions.

The process is similar when focused on a non-revenue metric. Returning to our Twitter example, acquisition tracking happens first upon a unique visit on the Twitter homepage.

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If the core activity and goal initially is daily use, one metric to first track and optimize for could be “number of follows.” After all, users are more likely to use the product once they understand how the product works which comes through following other relevant users.

In the sign up process, after seeing the homepage, a new user is directed to a one-page signup with preselected options such as staying signed in and tailoring Twitter based on recent website visits.

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Allowing Twitter to use website history from the browser helps the app tailor its recommendation of Twitter users to follow. After first landing on a “welcome/intro” page, the below onboarding process begins with providing suggestions for users to follow. Using Conrad Wadowski from GrowHack’s web history, Loius CK, Keven Hart, and Wall Street Journal start this process off, and help train the new potential user to follow others.

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After following a few users, a new user is then directed to find other users given a from a few popular categories.

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Once you track this onboarding process for the new user, you can begin to see where they fall out, and optimize for conversions. When you’re satisfied with the results, you can shift efforts towards other metrics which help define an active user, such as times logged in, or number of Tweets. You can then experiment with adding other steps into this initial onboarding process (and measuring along the way!) to better ensure a user is primed to be active in the long term, while keeping an eye out to make sure your onboarding is still working. Some additions in Twitter’s case for example could include adding a step to import contacts and create a new user profile.

This should be a start to get you thinking about converting customers in your own funnel. No matter what your goal is, it’s important to make sure each of these steps are defined and measured. This will allow you to best understand where the bottlenecks are, and begin hacking growth.

Want more news, lessons, and tools to help you with your digital marketing? Sign up for the Full Stack Marketing newsletter.

The State of Inbound Traffic in 2014

Do you know where your visitors are coming from? Go ahead and take a second to pop open your Google Analytics page and take a look.

My guess is it looks something like this:

October 2012 Inbound Traffic Sources

Everyone talks about social, but as of this time last year, social referrals were less than 15% of all inbound traffic. The truth is Google is still Goliath and social platforms are a bunch of Davids. This will remain true in 2014 just as it did in 2013.

It will take time to dethrone a source that currently accounts for over 40% of all inbound traffic. That's one source out of millions of websites, with a 40% market share!

Organic Search Engine Traffic October 2012-2013

But let's not dismiss social as just a fad. The long-term trends are promising as more people use and share via social platforms.

Search and Social Traffic October 2012-2013

Just look at how Facebook has increased it's referral traffic 170% in the last year!

Facebook Share of Visits November 2012-2013

What caused this growth? Likely growth in active users, new like and share buttons, and tweaks to edge rank and the newsfeed.

I expect this to even grow further with Zuckerberg's product vision for the newsfeed to become your personalized newspaper.

Social media is already very important and that importance is growing. You want to be have a presence there because that's where your customers spend a large amount of time. Getting any share of their attention is incredibly valuable. And getting to social and emerging platforms early to establish a presence makes it easier. You'll gain outsized credit.

But do not neglect Google and organic search for social. It carries intent driven traffic to your site that is often easier to monitize than social sharing. For as much as Google diversifies with Android, Chrome, and self-driving cars, Google search and adwords are the core product and bring in over 90% of the revenue.

Want more news, lessons, and tools to help you with your digital marketing? Sign up for the Full Stack Marketing newsletter.

The Role of the Full Stack Marketer

Why a Full Stack Marketer is Necessary

Peter TheilReid Hoffman, and  other successful entrepreneurs have noted, great distribution is key to a company’s success. 75% of startups fail because they never find product/market fit. You need to make sure you find and engage you core audience and that takes marketing. 

Do you want to increase the traffic to your website or downloads of your app? Do you need help creating a community of engaged fans on social media? Just as a full stack developer is needed to understand the technology stack from end-to-end, a marketer with a full stack of digital skills is required to meet today's marketing challenges.

When Do You Need a Full Stack Marketer?

Full stack marketers are great first marketing hires. In a large organization you usually have many experts in different channels and managers who have a skills in management and strategy. Full stack marketers know all digital marketing deeply, creating a great value.

What a Full Stack Marketer Needs to Know:

Marketing & Sales

  • SEO - How to acquire visitors via organic search by targeting the right keywords, building links, and optimizing your site
  • PPC - How to write, price, and choose keywords to drive targeted traffic at the right acquisition cost
  • Social Media - How to identify, build, and engage an audience on social platforms
  • Email marketing - How to segment and engage your audience while navigating changing email rules
  • App Store Marketing - How to optimize your app store listing to acquire users via app store search
  • PR - How to make a splash with a new announcement, either through with a traditional press release or in coordination with media outlets
  • Business Development - How to create and maintain partnerships to strategically grow your business

Creative

  • Copywriting - How to write a compelling story that draws in your audience, whether in a blog post or a 140 character tweet
  • Content Marketing - How to create compelling and sharable media

Technical Skills

  • Analytics - How to measure and assess changes to performance against a baseline metric
  • A/B Testing - How to locally optimize your site by making small tests
  • Landing Page Optimization - How to serve a page for a specific audience and use it to convert them to your goals
  • Basic HTML/CSS/Javascript - How to make changes to your product to enable your marketing goals by yourself

Where Can You Find Full Stack Marketers?

Most self identify themselves. I made a twitter list of full stack marketers I know. Also look at who the first marketing hire was at tech companies and startups.

How Can You Learn to Be A Full Stack Marketer?

My blog is dedicated to this topic. From basics to advanced tactics and process, I'm committed to helping you learn digital marketing.

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The End Of The Library | TechCrunch

I feel like parislemon - who’s views on technology trends I usually find spot on - missed a whole segment of the market. The internet is better than the library for people who have access to the internet. However 35% of americans do not have high-speed internet access at home. Libraries are necessary for those who are not as well off.

Now, maybe in the future we’ll get better broadband in this country that competes on price and speed versus other industrialized nations. Access would be available to all. At that point, theoretically, libraries could cease to exist with little problem.

The question becomes: which trend is moving faster? Increased access to high-speed internet or decreased funding for libraries?

If it’s the former, then libraries are a line-item we can cross off the public ledger guilt free. But if it’s the latter and libraries go away while a large swatch of americans live without broadband, then we are going to create a large uninformed underclass in this country. That prospect is dangerous to an informed and well functioning democracy

A VC: Tech Is NYC's Second Largest Job Sector

Chicago also follows this pattern of tech startups that embed themselves in the city’s larger industries.

It explains why there are lots of sales tech and retail tech companies, for example. I wouldn’t be surprised to see more manufacturing, insurance, travel, and food tech startups emerging here soon based on this pattern. All those industries (excepting travel) have a lot of innovation potential.

Apple Builds Mainstream Phones, Just Look at the Moto X

The iPhone 5c was announced almost two weeks ago to sticker shock. Analysts and pundits - a class of Hedgehogs - bemoaned that the phone was not the low price phone they were looking for. At $550 of contract, the iPhone 5c is out of the price range of the developing middle class of emerging economies such as China and Brazil.

The typical reasoning why Apple is losing market share - at least in phones sold, not usage - is that manufacturers flood the market with low cost Android phones. Even the pundits, one hopes, don’t expect Apple to compete against crap-ware. So when they want a low-cost iPhone 5c, who are they expecting it to compete against to gain back marketshare?

Samsung, HTC, and Motorola all follow the same model Apple does. They have flagship phones aimed at the high-end of the market supplemented by “mini” models1 that are lower cost. Presumably analysts also wanted Apple to manufacture a “mini” model and follow their competitors.

But how well does this portfolio strategy work? Famously, Samsung is the only Android manufacturing capturing profit. While we can’t breakout Galaxy mini profits due to lack of data, clearly the strategy is not working for other manufacturers. I would argue Samsung makes most of its money of its flagship phones, just as Apple does.

The iPhone 5c reminded me not of a “mini” phone but of another Android device with a high profile launch: the Moto X. The value propositions of both phones are too similar to be overlooked: The emphasis on color, not competing on the latest specs, and both running the purest experience of the OS. Motorola (read: Google) made a phone full of compromises after countless focus groups with mainstream consumers.

For a 16 GB model, the Moto X retails for $200 on contract, and $650 unlocked. This is the same pricing scheme the “mini” flagship Android models follow as well. Compare this to the iPhone 5c. A 16 GB 5c retails for $99 on contract and $550 unlocked. Presumably these phones are all chasing the same market, yet Apple is the one offering the cheaper option. It is Apple, not Google or Samsung or anyone else, who is making the low cost smartphone for a mass market and is making a profit off it. And it’s a quality device too.

The Moto X is clearly aimed at the American public with its “Made in America” manufacturing, while the biggest opportunity for Apple continues to be emerging markets. Maybe Apple’s strategy is still not tuned into to that consumer and the 5c is still to expensive. OK, but who else is really posed to capture that market with an aspirational value proposition? In a year, the 5c will be free on contract and $550 unlocked. That’s a very attractive option for any market.

The Hedgehogs continued to be underwhelmed by Apple’s smartphone strategy. They also continue to overlook the real playing field of competition. The Galaxy S and Moto X do squeeze Apple a little on the high-end, but unless it’s crap-ware, Apple is really the only one with a great value proposition for a mainstream consumer. I expect the iPhone 5c to be another success for Apple’s portfolio of products.


  1. Samsung Galaxy 3 Mini, HTC One Mini, and the Droid Mini 

The T-Shaped Web Marketer - Rand's Blog

I 100% completely agree with Rand’s post. But “T-shaped Marketer” just doesn’t have the same ring to it that “Full Stack Marketer” does.

Maybe we could call it being a “Peak Marketer”? Instead of the t-shape, flip it on the x-axis, so as your expertise increases, you climb upwards towards the peak. You also gain some more intermediate knowledge on adjacent marketing areas. It also relates to Chip Conley’s peak experience.

So you can be a Peak Marketer in SEO. Or maybe you’re a Twin Peak Marketer in SEO and Social Media. In terms of branding, just thinks that sounds better.

Addendum to my Nintendo Post

We actually already have data on how well a Nintendo game would sell on iOS. Currently the number one paid app in the app store is Remote File Manager. Why is it number one? Because it has a secret Super Nintendo emulator. There are also a number of Super Mario clones that always do well on the charts as well.

The only risk Nintendo faces by releasing a game on iOS is potential cannibalization. Given 3DS and WiiU sales, I find it hard to believe that the customer bases overlap much. Even if they do, die-hard Nintendo fans are likely to buy the game on both platforms (Ask yourself how many times you’ve bought the same version of a Nintendo game on different platforms? I know I’ve bought original Nintendo games and then again on GBA and the WII Virtual Console). If anything, exposing Nintendo IP is likely an appetizer that could ignite hardware sales.

It’s hard to say anything is a no-brainer, but we have actual sales data. Nintendo can only stick its head in the ground for so long…

Hypercritical: Nintendo in Crisis

Yes, Nintendo is innovative and swings for the fences. But all too often I feel that anything that isn’t a revolutionary feature they either half ass or just choose not to incorporate because their competitors do it.

Here’s an example: online gaming. I own a Wii and XBOX360. Online multiplayer on the XBOX through XBOX Live couldn’t be easier. It’s tightly integrated with their games. When I was fresh out of college, it was incredibly easy to pick up a game of Halo 3 with anybody online. On the other hand, you have the Wii experience with Friend Codes, which is a random string that is assigned to your Wii. So if you want to play with a friend, you have to call/email/text them and get their random string from them. I also remember when Mario Kart for Wii came out and it just was such a hard experience playing multiplayer with random people online. Online multiplayer had already been growing for years before the Wii debuted. Why did they neglect this so badly?

You can continue this line of thinking with other Nintendo consoles. N64 introduced the joystick on controller. But Nintendo also chose to support cartridges when everyone else moved to discs. The Gamecube chose a poor disc format (miniDVD) and eschewed any online multiplayer. The WiiU brought a touchscreen interface to the home console (smart), but it’s a poor resistive touchcreen instead of capacitive. And Nintendo may have a first mover advantage with innovation, but it quickly gets surpassed. The technology in the PS Move and XBOX Kinect is arguably much more impressive then a controller with a gyroscope and IR sensor.

I grew up on a grey brick Game Boy (I owned them all the way through the Game Boy Advanced). I love Zelda, Mario, and Metroid. I’ve bought consoles just for these IPs. But I really don’t think Nintendo is a state of the art hardware company. If they were, they wouldn’t have neglected so many of these antes that gamers want in a modern console. yes, even if aimed at a more casual market.

Nintendo’s strengths are its culture of innovation and strong IP. My generation also has nostalgia for playing these IPs on an NES. Kids today won’t. I have to conclude that Nintendo should push the boundaries of what other modern pieces of hardware can do by bringing its IP to other platforms.

How to Correctly Post on Each Social Media Platform

I get this question often:

"We post the same content on all our social media. How should we properly optimize content on each platform?"

The key to answering this question is understanding how each platform’s stream algorithm and how they display different types of media. 

Facebook

Facebook’s edgerank algorithm favors pictures over other types of content. I encourage brands to post pictures with short messages that link through to landing pages. PostRocket is a great tool that helps with this. 

Facebook is also good for conversation. It’s a great platform to ask questions on. Questions tend to get more engagement than statements do. This example from Starbucks illustrates how a question can generate greater engagement:

Twitter

Twitter is a great platform for gaining audience and driving click-throughs. The way I encourage brands to think about twitter is based on their goals. With any tweet, is your goal for it to be shared or for it to drive a click-through? The goals are diametrically opposed and not optimizing for either results in neither sharing nor click-throughs.

If a brand wants to drive traffic, then their tweet should be a short teaser statement with a link. An example: “What are the top 10 secrets to great startups?”

The other option is to drive sharing. This means your statement should be a complete thought. Think about a great newspaper headline that gives you all the info you need. For example: “Secrets to great startups: focused mission, aligned team, smart founders.”

I also encourage brands to research and use hashtags.

Google+

Google+ is like a mashup of Facebook and Twitter. Posts display rich content like Facebook, but most content is displayed in a chronological order.

Google+ is the platform for conversations and they try to make this as easy as possible with post comments, separate circle audiences, and text and video hangouts. Remember how I said “most content is displayed in chronological order”? That is because Google will promote posts with high engagement so that users are staying fresh with recent conversations.

If you want to make a post standout, Google allows you to upload pictures up to 2048 px for free. High resolution photography stands out. Bolding text in the title of a post also helps attract eyes.

Just like twitter, I encourage using hashtags in Google+ posts. Google will also auto-generate relevant hashtags for you.

Conclusion

Know your goals. Post pictures on Facebook and Google+. Use teasers and links to drive click-throughs on Twitter. Conversations get highlighted in Google+.

These tips will help you get noticed and engage more deeply with your audience.

Never Ask Users To Do Something You Wouldn't Do Yourself

thedailywhat: You Saw This Coming of the Day: Jay-Z’s New Album App Raises Privacy Concerns Yesterday, Jay-Z released his twelfth studio album Magna Carta Holy Grail exclusively to the first 1 million downloaders of a $5 mobile app available on Samsung’s Galaxy phones. However, the app’s terms of service have not been been sitting well with fans. On Tuesday, rapper Killer Mike tweeted a screenshot (shown above) of the app’s permissions, which shows a long list of requests to access the downloader’s GPS location and to keep the phone from going into sleep mode. Is a free Jay-Z record worth handing over your phone’s intimate details? This is bad practice. You should never ask your users to do something you wouldn’t do yourself. The spam tweets and Facebook posts are a bit much… But he’s jay-z so enough people opted in anyway and Samsung got exactly what they wanted. Doesn’t make it right, but they knew what they have the clout to get away with. And they did since the record will go platinum from day one.

thedailywhat:

You Saw This Coming of the Day: Jay-Z’s New Album App Raises Privacy Concerns

Yesterday, Jay-Z released his twelfth studio album Magna Carta Holy Grail exclusively to the first 1 million downloaders of a $5 mobile app available on Samsung’s Galaxy phones. However, the app’s terms of service have not been been sitting well with fans. On Tuesday, rapper Killer Mike tweeted a screenshot (shown above) of the app’s permissions, which shows a long list of requests to access the downloader’s GPS location and to keep the phone from going into sleep mode. Is a free Jay-Z record worth handing over your phone’s intimate details?

This is bad practice. You should never ask your users to do something you wouldn’t do yourself. The spam tweets and Facebook posts are a bit much…

But he’s jay-z so enough people opted in anyway and Samsung got exactly what they wanted. Doesn’t make it right, but they knew what they have the clout to get away with. And they did since the record will go platinum from day one.

Don't Buy Facebook Likes

thedailywhat: Social Media Strategy of the Day: State Department Spent $630,000 on Facebook ‘Likes’ Now that the whole world knows for certain that American taxpayers’ money has been funding the surveillance of citizens and foreign governments, try wrapping your heads around this one: Between 2011 and 2013, U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Information Programs spent $630,000 on racking up Facebook “likes.” According to a report recently published by The Office of Inspector General, which was prompted after several Department employees filed a complaint about the expenses, the State Department actively maintains four separate Facebook pages, from which they have accumulated more than 2 million likes over the last two years. Wow. Very surprised the state department did his. What was their goal? If it is to inform the public, how would fake likes help? Usually likes are bought to establish credibility. But this is the state department! It’s a well known government institution. Also, it seems like they grossly overpaid. I’m just…wow

thedailywhat:

Social Media Strategy of the Day: State Department Spent $630,000 on Facebook ‘Likes’

Now that the whole world knows for certain that American taxpayers’ money has been funding the surveillance of citizens and foreign governments, try wrapping your heads around this one: Between 2011 and 2013, U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Information Programs spent $630,000 on racking up Facebook “likes.” According to a report recently published by The Office of Inspector General, which was prompted after several Department employees filed a complaint about the expenses, the State Department actively maintains four separate Facebook pages, from which they have accumulated more than 2 million likes over the last two years.

Wow. Very surprised the state department did his. What was their goal? If it is to inform the public, how would fake likes help?

Usually likes are bought to establish credibility. But this is the state department! It’s a well known government institution. Also, it seems like they grossly overpaid. I’m just…wow

Video for Instagram vs. Vine

I’ve already seen a friend of mine who has built a great audience on Vine switch to Instagram for Video. As big as he’s grown his Vine following, his Instagram following is even bigger. It’s a no brainer for him to switch over.

Playing with video on Instagram, I really miss Vine’s loop feature. I’m surprised how accustomed I’d become to expecting that and how much I enjoy it. I also find Vine loads faster, but I’m sure Instagram is getting hammered today.

Ultimately, I think it depends on which social network a person shares on primarily. If they post on facebook, they’ll use Instagram. If they use twitter primarily, they’ll use Vine. The market is probably big enough to support both.

Some thoughts on mobile

parislemon:

Chris Dixon:

If you go back and look at the history of productivity apps you’ll see that each major user interface shift led to new classes of productivity apps. Back in the 70s and 80s, when computers had text-based interfaces, word processor applications like Wordperfect and spreadsheet applications like Lotus 1-2-3 were invented. In the 80s and 90s, when graphical interfaces became popular, presentation apps like Powerpoint and photo editing apps like Photoshop were invented. If the historical pattern repeats, productivity apps that are “native” to the tablet will be invented.

Things like Paper strike me as getting there already.

Word processing works on tablets now, but presentations and spreadsheets don’t. Presentations, with apps like Haiku, are easier to translate. The biggest opportunity is figuring out how to translate spreadsheets into a tablet native environment

Zero-TV Homes on the Rise

parislemon: courtenaybird: Nielsen reported this spring that there are now over 5 million cord cutters in the U.S., up from 3 million in 2007. In these “zero tv” households, almost half were under the age of 35. (via TechCrunch) It’s important to note that “zero TV” doesn’t mean these homes don’t have televisions — most do. It simply means they’re not paying for cable.  The graph above clearly illustrates what might be considered a “trend”. Or, to put it another way, winter is coming.

parislemon:

courtenaybird:

Nielsen reported this spring that there are now over 5 million cord cutters in the U.S., up from 3 million in 2007. In these “zero tv” households, almost half were under the age of 35.

(via TechCrunch)

It’s important to note that “zero TV” doesn’t mean these homes don’t have televisions — most do. It simply means they’re not paying for cable. 

The graph above clearly illustrates what might be considered a “trend”. Or, to put it another way, winter is coming.

Twitter #music Follow-up

thisistheverge: A month after launch, have we forgotten about Twitter #Music? By now, that buzz is a distant memory. Last week #Music fell out of iOS’s top 100 free music apps; it currently sits at #113, shoulder-to-shoulder with Last.fm. Even worse, for a natively social company like Twitter, is the deafening silence. If people are using it, they’re staying very quiet about it. Failure is hardly a taboo in the startup world, but coming this soon after a much-feted launch, it raises the obvious question: can #Music survive in one of the hottest, most competitive spaces in the industry?  I haven’t haven’t used #music since it debuted. It’s not for me, but it could be for teens. If even the teens aren’t using it, it’s not likely to find much success. The use case just isn’t there.

thisistheverge:

A month after launch, have we forgotten about Twitter #Music?

By now, that buzz is a distant memory. Last week #Music fell out of iOS’s top 100 free music apps; it currently sits at #113, shoulder-to-shoulder with Last.fm. Even worse, for a natively social company like Twitter, is the deafening silence. If people are using it, they’re staying very quiet about it. Failure is hardly a taboo in the startup world, but coming this soon after a much-feted launch, it raises the obvious question: can #Music survive in one of the hottest, most competitive spaces in the industry? 

I haven’t haven’t used #music since it debuted. It’s not for me, but it could be for teens. If even the teens aren’t using it, it’s not likely to find much success. The use case just isn’t there.